Medicine

More deaths in the E. coli outbreak tied to romaine lettuce

More deaths in the E. coli outbreak tied to romaine lettuce

There is typically a lag between the time when someone falls ill and the CDC is alerted.

In addition, officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention updated the case count: 197 people from 35 states were sickened.

- Four more deaths have been linked to a national food poisoning outbreak blamed on tainted lettuce, bringing the total to five.

The growing season there ended six weeks ago, and it's unlikely any tainted lettuce is still in stores or people's homes, given its short shelf life. The five dead were reportedly from Arkansas, New York, California and, with two cases, Minnesota.

In the update Friday on the nation's largest E. coli outbreak in a decade, health officials said 25 new cases have been added, and at least 89 people were hospitalized.

Officials said that first illness began sometime between March 13 and May 12.

More news: Trump Wishes He'd Never Chosen Jeff Sessions as Attorney General
More news: USA vows UN Security Council veto of proposal on Palestinians
More news: 4Singapore Airlines to launch world's longest flight

Symptoms of E. coli vary, but include may include stomach cramps, fevers, bloody diarrhea and vomiting among others.

Most E. coli bacteria are not harmful, but some produce toxins that can cause severe illness.

Officials urge anyone who thinks they may be ill with an E. coli infection to see their doctor.

Romaine lettuce from the Yuma growing region in Arizona is thought to be the source of the latest outbreak, although the Food and Drug Administration said no single grower, distributor or region could account for the spread.

The CDC also noted that some people who became sick had not eaten romaine lettuce, but had close contact with someone else who get sick from eating it. Of those three cases, two developed a potentially fatal condition called hemolytic uremic syndrome that sometimes leads to kidney failure.