Medicine

Trump asks Saudi Arabia to allow immediate aid to Yemen

Trump asks Saudi Arabia to allow immediate aid to Yemen

Yemen's civil war has caused a desperate starvation in the country, as well as a cholera epidemic that has killed more than 2,000 people.

Although the conflict began as a civil war between Shiite Houthis and the government of Saudi-backed former President Abdrabbuh Mansour Hadi, it has morphed into a proxy battle between Saudi Arabia and Iran, which has lent support to the Houthis.

There was no independent confirmation, but pictures circulated on social media appeared to show Mr Saleh's body.

RSF's sources said the journalists were forced to surrender the TV channel's access codes, enabling the Houthis to broadcast their own content.

Yemen's pro-Houthi Al Masirah television station said the coalition bombed Saleh's residence and other houses of his family members.

Dujarric, the U.N. spokesman, told reporters that U.N. special envoy for Yemen Ismail Ould Cheikh Ahmed told a closed meeting of the U.N. Security Council that the killing of Saleh and others was "an adverse development" that will "constitute a considerable change to the political dynamics in Yemen".

Saleh's oldest son meanwhile pledged in a declaration sent to Reuters to fight the Houthis and liberate all territory held by the rebels. That helped propel Yemen into the ruinous civil war that has spread hunger and disease among its 28 million people.

Sayyid said Saleh and other top party officials had came under Huthi gunfire as they fled Sanaa.

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The collapse of the alliance between Saleh and the rebels saw at least 100 people reported dead in fighting, accusations of betrayal and the former leader reaching out to the Saudi- led coalition.

Saleh's slaying likely gives the rebels the upper hand in the dayslong fighting for the country's capital, Sanaa.

The Houthis seized Sanaa in September 2014, forcing the government of president Abdrabu Mansur Hadi to relocate to the southern city of Aden.

However, in late November, the tensions between the former allies escalated and resulted in clashes that have already claimed lives of hundreds of people, including the ex-president himself.

Global aid groups warned today they were losing the ability to reach civilians in Sanaa.

A least 234 people were killed in fighting that the International Committee of the Red Cross described as the fiercest since the start of the conflict.

The casualty tolls provided by the ICRC are separate from those sustained in airstrikes by the Saudi-led coalition which is waging war on the rebels, known as Houthis.